Tag Archives: Empowered Passenger

Passenger Ethics: Sit By Not Idly

If you employ a chauffeur, then you’ve fairly bought the privilege to criticize his performance as harshly as you please. But, the rest of us ride gratis, so we bite our tongues. Occasionally, we witness our friends, family members, co-workers, and classmates behaving irresponsibly behind the wheel. We feel with them; no one appreciates a back-seat driver. They aren’t our chauffeurs, and we can’t very well treat them like servants, can we? To criticize an equal’s every little fault would be—indecent.

And, anyway, their errors are mostly forgivable. They pass on the right, they merge across a solid white line, they devote both hands to fiddling with their cellphones while “steering” with their knees…No, wait! Stop! That’s super-dangerous! Even riding with friends, family, members, co-workers, and classmates, situations like the latter do arise that positively demand criticism. Where is the line? It’s probably closer to everyday life than most would suppose.

Plenty of facts and statistics support passengers intervening to dissuade drivers from behaving irresponsibly behind the wheel. For example, “distracted driving” caused 3,459 deaths in 2015. Of all those who died in automobile crashes that same year, 48% were not wearing their seat belts. The truth is plain enough: If we would speak up, we’d have no lack of things to say.

None of this evidence is really relevant to the question, though, is it? We all know how dangerous distracted driving is. We all know we should wear our seat belts. We all know we should obey the rules of the road. Like smoking in the presence of a baby, the question is really one of the limits of propriety: How serious an offense should one permit before protesting? How much smoke is it worth exposing a baby to before enough is enough, and any decent person would break that silence? The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) offers some good guidelines for passengers in a variety of situations and—what’s most helpful—relationships to the driver. This graphic also suggests a few polite ways passengers can encourage safer driving, as does this one aimed specifically at teenagers.

The bottom line is this, though: the limits of propriety exist not to hinder and confuse but to assist living-together. If you know something makes living-together more difficult, like behaving irresponsibly behind the wheel, is it not right and proper to speak up? Even as passengers, we have that power—and no rational system of ethics denies the exercise of power to those who would use it justly. On the contrary, all of the best ones insist on it.


NC Vision Zero aims to empower North Carolina’s passengers. You can assist in their mission—and win an enviable prize to boot—by participating in the Empowered Passenger Video Contest.  For more information, look up ncvisionzero.org/empoweredpassenger.  

Empowered Passenger Contest Poster
Contest Poster

The Empowered Passenger Video Contest

Prompt
When someone else’s driving makes you feel unsafe, you have the responsibility to speak out. Speaking out empowers—we call them who speak out empowered passengers! How do you speak out when someone else’s driving makes you feel unsafe?

Shoot a short video. Tell others a story of passenger-empowerment. History or fiction. Be creative. Entertain, but be sure to instruct as well.

Submission
Submit your video electronically by either of the following methods:

  1. Upload your video to Youtube.
  2. Post a link to your video on Instagram or Twitter along with the hashtag #EmpoweredPassenger.

OR

  1. Upload your video to Youtube.
  2. On the contest gallery page, enter the Youtube URL in the form.
  3. Complete the form and click “Submit.”

Deadline
11:59 PM on 19 August 2017.  

Winning
As determined by a group of judges, the cleverest, most creative video will win its maker two AllSport Passes to the U.S. National Whitewater Center.  A member of NC Vision Zero team will email the winner once judging is complete to obtain a mailing address.  

Restrictions
Please do not behave unsafely while filming. Use your creativity to depict dangerous situations without you or anyone else actually experiencing one. For example:

  • Do not film while behind the wheel, even if the vehicle is stopped.
  • Do not film others without their consent.
  • Do not break any laws, ordinances, regulations, etc.

Also, Keep it G-rated.  

Only current residents of North Carolina may participate.

Violating any of these restrictions will disqualify you, so watch out!

Intellectual Property Rights
You retain ownership of your work.  By submitting, you implicitly grant ITRE the right to use and distribute your work for any purpose related to the NC Vision Zero initiative, including on its website and social media accounts.

Go to the Submission Form →

 


Many civic institutions collaborate in pursuit of NC Vision Zero’s goal. They are all dedicated to eliminating roadway fatalities in North Carolina—but real, positive change requires conscientious citizens like you. Keep up the effort! Check out our website at ncvisionzero.org for more information and resources you can use to help make our roads safer.